Getting hot and hefe with Analog Brewing

When we lived in Calgary, my wife Lea and I enjoyed a few getaways to Montana. It was mainly for skiing and other outdoor pursuits in and around Whitefish, but I was always eager for an opportunity to dive into Montana’s rich craft beer culture — particularly in the pre-2013 era before Alberta’s scene took off.

I enjoyed visiting several breweries during our trips to Montana, but I regret never making it to Bowser Brewing in Great Falls before it closed in 2017. A few friends recommended the place, and there was one beer that immediately caught my eye when I visited their website several years ago: a hefeweizen made with jalapeno peppers. With the right execution, I thought it could be an interesting and highly drinkable beer.

Bowser Brewing’s demise prevented me from finding out — until now, that is. I recently discovered Edmonton’s Analog Brewing made a jalapeno hefeweizen called Na’cho Hefe, and I just knew that I had to try it.

From what I can tell, it’s a small-batch release available on tap at the brewery and other select locations. I tracked it down at Little Guy Liquor Store in Sherwood Park, where it was available at the growler bar. After trying the beer over the long weekend, I can say it was worth the drive from downtown Edmonton.

When I first heard about Bowser’s jalapeno hefeweizen, an idea formed in my mind about what the beer should taste like. While I never got to try theirs, Analog’s Na’cho Hefe lived up to my lofty expectations.

You notice jalapeno in Na’cho Hefe right away: it’s in the aroma when you smell it. But so are the elements you expect in a well-made hefeweizen, banana esters and some spicy, earthy cloves. The flavour mainly follows the aroma, but the esters shift a bit from banana on the nose to some bubblegum on the palate as well. The mouthfeel is medium-bodied and just right for the style. The jalapeno is there, but it’s an undertone and provides just a slight spicy tingle. (I took a bit of licence with “Hot and hefe” in the headline, because of its pun value and for the sake of making a Seinfeld reference on that basis. This beer isn’t “hot” at all, so don’t let that deter you.)

Flavouring beer with added ingredients is always a balancing act: First, you have to choose something that will marry well with the base beer. Then, you have to add it in a manner and in a quantity that hits a sweet spot between ensuring people know it’s there, but not so much that it detracts from the drinkability of the beer.

Analog has successfully walked that metaphorical tightrope and made a beer that has a distinct jalapeno flavour, but remains unmistakably a hefeweizen. Most importantly of all, it’s not a one-and-done novelty: I reached for a second glass and enjoyed it as much as the first.

Having said all that, I should acknowledge that I’m more open to experimentation than a lot of beer drinkers. At its worst, beer nerd subculture is insular and isn’t concerned with what a wider audience may want. Fanbois and fangirls often venerate brewers for outlandish things they can do, as opposed to considering whether they should have done it. A beer made with kids’ breakfast cereal may rate as a technical achievement and become a cool conversation piece, but does it have any lasting appeal?

I found Na’cho Hefe plenty drinkable on its own, and I think it has added appeal as a pairing with the right kind of food. I enjoyed it with some barbecue chicken I made for supper, and I bet it would be awesome with (yes) nachos and/or chicken wings, too. I’d love to see Analog make more of this beer, but that’s easy for me to say as someone who isn’t a brewery owner with bills to pay. I’d be happy to see it again, but I also understand if it’s a long time before I do.